Do you have any unclaimed money? Check to find out!


raining money

There’s a lot of frozen money out there that no one is claiming .. it’s in the billions. Some put the figure as high as $40 billion! Is any of it yours? Some of it could be if you’ve ever moved to another state or to another residence; if you’ve changed your name; if you’ve forgotten about a small bank account or a few shares of stock; or if a distant relative left you something in a life insurance policy or will.

Here are some of the most common forms of unclaimed money:

  • Inactive bank accounts, both checking and savings
  • Unfound life insurance or other account beneficiaries
  • Tax refunds that were misdirected
  • Unreturned utility deposits and escrow accounts
  • Refunds and credits
  • Stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and dividends
  • Uncashed checks and wages
  • Insurance policies, CDs, trust funds
  • Unredeemed money orders or travelers checks
  • Unclaimed safe deposit boxes

If you’d like to check to see if there is any unclaimed money due you, here’s a tip:
The best place to start is MissingMoney.com.

This site is the only only free, state endorsed national database of missing money. The site is officially endorsed by NAUPA (National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators) and participating states and provinces. The site will assist you in thoroughly searching all participating states to find your family’s missing, lost, and unclaimed property, money and assets. It has the most updated information for the state and provincial offices. Searches and claiming are always FREE.

We tried it out and found a $65 insurance policy refund from a neighboring state we lived in more than 10 years ago. We filed a claim and the money will be sent to us. You can search the entire database or confine to a specific state. Don’t forget to search by any variations in your name. Here are some search tips and frequently asked questions.

Other resources for unclaimed money

While MissingMoney.com is the best site, you can also check these sources, too:

Scam alert – don’t get hooked

Beware of scams related to unclaimed money. While we’d all like to think that we won some money that we didn’t know about or have a distant wealthy deceased aunt who left us her fortune, it’s not likely to be true. Scammers thrive on our hopes, fantasies and greed – don’t give them the opportunity.

  • Beware of emails and phone calls that alert you to winnings or other unclaimed money. State and federal authorities do not use email or phone to notify you of unclaimed money. The IRS will never threaten you to “pay now or else.”
  • Beware of people who ask for bank or credit card information or personal details to process your winnings/inheritance.
  • Be careful of unauthorized search sites that charge a fee to use. Stick to the sites we’ve mentioned or call your state’s unclaimed money office or insurance bureau if you have questions.
  • Beware of people who try to charge you. While there are some legitimate finder businesses that search for lost property owners and offer to inform them of how to obtain their property for a fee, most “out of the blue” alerts should be treated with a high degree of suspicion. NAUPA recommends that “Before signing any contract from a firm of this type, we recommend that you be cautious and contact the unclaimed property office in your state for more information.” Plus, you are better running your own searches periodically and avoiding any fees!

Check out these scam alerts:

Pokemon Go zombies: Police say to take care


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Image via pokemongo.com

PokemonGO-June15-Seadra-on-map

Image via pokemongo.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

You can be forgiven if you think there is a zombie apocalypse going on. In almost any given public space, crowds of people are wandering around in a transfixed state. Don’t be alarmed, they are just playing Pokemon Go, the new augemented reality phone game craze that’s sweeping the nation. Check out this brief but amusing video clip of Pokemon Go players at Central Park!

On the upside, Pokemon is an unexpected source of health: many people are gaming their way to fitness.

Pokemon are little Japanese monsters that you are supposed to catch – made popular in video games by Nintendo. Now, there’s a new augmented reality version that you can download and play on your phone.
Instead of simply chasing down the monsters on a video screen, you must go out to find and capture the collection of 100+ monsters in a real-world scavenger hunt. In the short time since the game’s release on July 6, it’s taken the world by storm… and it’s having an unintended side effect for many … it is increasing their exercise. It may be the biggest game-related exercise motivator since the introduction of the Wii and the Wiifit .

On the downside, public safety officials, police and gamers themselves are reporting some problems:

  • Distracted walking & running
  • Distracted Driving
  • Other unsafe behaviors and lapses in common sense
  • Criminals may use the game to lure you in

It appears some of the main problems are injuries from falls, sprains and strains from players not looking where they were going, walking into objects, tripping or the like. Other gamers complain of sunburns from being outside all day. People are sharing reports of their Pokemon Go injuries all over social media

This news story lists other problems, too. There have also been a few police reports of robberies where criminals have set up fake PokeSpots to target players. And bizarrely, instead of finding a Pokemon monster, one poor user chanced upon a dead body!

Safety officials say keep your common sense about you. Don’t drive while playing – that’s just stupid and would be illegal in most states. Don’t play while riding on bikes or skateboarding, either. Don’t go out walking around alone at night if you wouldn’t normally do so. Be careful about going to neighborhoods or places that you are unfamiliar with. Be careful about intruding on private property. Stay alert for urban an natural hazards in your path. Authorities say to use caution when alerting strangers of your future location.

So like many other popular things, it’s fun but be careful!

Learn more at the Pokemon Go official site  or check out this article with Your biggest Pokémon Go questions, answered.

Getting married? What you need to know about wedding insurance and other financial considerations


Wedding ChecklistGetting married? There’s a lot you need to think of both before and after the wedding, but in all the planning, one of the things that is often overlooked is your insurance insurance needs. Have you notified your insurance agent about your plans? He or she can be one of your best friends! For example, as a couple, you may be eligible for auto discounts or a savings on health insurance. You may also want to secure life insurance, and should be sure to change the beneficiaries on any key insurance or savings plans that you do have. The Insurance Information Insituitue (III) offers a handy checklist of insurance considerations for married couples.

You should also ask your agent about wedding insurance to protect your investment in the big day, particularly if you are planning a big celebration. Wedding insurance is a type of special event insurance designed provide financial protection for various problems that could arise, such as the need to cancel or postpone due to weather or natural disasters. III says:

“Most policies also provide coverage for cancellation due to the death, illness or serious injury of a key participants in the event, such as members of the immediate family. Also, if an officiant, such as a minister or rabbi, or a key vendor, like the caterer, florist or photographer, does not show up, you can recover some of the costs.”

Different insurance companies offer special coverage that you can add on, such as protection for gowns, gifts and honeymoons.

Of course, insurance is only one of the things you need to think about. You need to know your state law. Below is a very helpful 2-part guide to getting married in Massachusetts … it offers a great breakdown of things you need to plan both before and after the wedding. While laws vary by state, the MA Guide offers a simple checklist for some of the common issues and responsibilities people need to consider and address, no matter where they live. We’ve also included links to laws for other states.

Getting Married in Massachusetts

Part 1: What you need to do before the wedding

  • Who Can Get Married in Massachusetts?
  • Who Can Conduct a Wedding in Massachusetts?
  • Where Can We Get Married in Massachusetts?
  • What Paperwork Do We Need to Get Married in Massachusetts?

Part 2: What you need to do after the wedding

  • Getting Proof of Your Marriage
  • Changing Your Name and Getting a New ID
  • Filing Taxes After You Get Married
  • Marriages Outside of Massachusetts


Marriage laws in other states

How to celebrate July 4 in New England


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Here in New England, everything about the upcoming July 4 weekend looks promising – the weather looks spectacular, gas prices are low and the region is chock full of events and celebrations. We’ve listed links to information on some of New England’s best July 4 celebrations below … and we send you on your way with the requisite reminders about firework safety and holiday driving safety. Not to be a Debbie Downer but the rods will be packed and July 4 ranks as “the deadliest single day of the year to be on the road, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS).”

But with those cautions in mind, here are some ideas for your weekend!

When guarding against summer burglaries, don’t forget your yard


There are more than two million home burglaries per year, according to the FBI, and the highest percentage of burglaries occurs during the summer months. It’s not hard to figure out why. It’s peak vacation season so a lot of homes are empty; plus, with warm weather, there’s an increase in the number of doors and windows left open, which make accessibility easier. According to Safeguard the World:

  • About 30 percent of all burglaries are through an open or unlocked window or door.
  • Windows are left unlocked at a much higher rate than doors.
  • An open window that is visible from the street may be the sole reason that a house is targeted.
  • An open window with only a locked window screen is particularly inviting to thieves. Access is quick, easy and silent.

See more statistics along with prevention tips.

One other seasonal vulnerability is highlighted in a recent survey conducted by one of our insurer partners. American Modern Insurance points out that in good weather, there are simply more unsecured “backyard valuables” lying around: bikes, sporting equipment, grilles, lawn furniture – all relatively easy targets for thieves. Copper coils from air conditioners and other metallic items can be sold for scrap metal.

“An American Modern survey of more than 500 adults living in the US, indicated that 31 percent do not take proactive steps to secure property and personal items located on the outside of the home. Additionally, the survey indicated that respondents were most likely to take steps to protect their electronics (42%), as well as jewelry and watches (23%) inside their homes, and less likely to do so with outdoor/recreational items (18%). The survey was conducted through Google in June 2016.”

In their press release, American Modern offers 10 tips, which we reproduce here:

1. Install strong door locks and deadbolts. Choose a lock that is proven to withstand drilling or picking.

2. Reinforce doorjambs and strike plates. Most often, structural failures occur when strike plates separate from doorframes.

3. Apply window security film. This prevents glass breakage and can deter a smash-and-grab.

4. Lock your windows. If your windows don’t already have locks, add them. Or, drill small holes into the upper and lower sashes at their overlap point and insert removable eyebolts.

5. Close and lock your shed and garage every night. Make sure your vehicles are under cover and secure before you head out of town. On a smaller scale, stolen tools and lawn equipment are also a lucrative theft item, so ensure these items are securely stored away. The garage can also serve as a common entry point for burglars.

6. When away from home, don’t advertise your absence. Put temporary holds on mail and newspaper delivery, or have a trusted neighbor collect them. Put lights on staggered timers. Also, avoid posting on social media about your travel plans, which can increase the risk of burglaries and break-ins while you are away from your property.

7. Keep valuables outside the bedroom. Thieves on the hunt for valuables will likely make the master bedroom their first stop to scout out jewelry or cash. Keep these items in a different room instead.

8. Put in motion-activated outdoor lighting. Make sure entry points are especially well-lit.

9. Organize a Neighborhood Watch. Meet your neighbors and deter theft!

10. Vehicles and items left in them. Most vehicle-related thefts take place in under 20 seconds. Never leave loose items on the seats or dash; lock them in the trunk or, better yet, take them inside with you. If you have a garage at home, use it. If you must park on the street, install a loud alarm system with a visible, blinking dash light.