17 guides to help you make the most of summer in New England


New England has a relatively short summer season, but we manage to pack a lot of fun things into those few months … from lobster, clam & blueberry fests to concerts, historic events and cultural heritage celebrations … plus, we have wonderful beaches, parks, hiking trails and natural resources. We’ve compiled a guide of events and “best of” picks to help you plan out your summer.

New England Festivals 2017 – 2018 Calendar – from everfest, search by category – such as performing arts, cultural, food & beverage, seasonal or holiday, etc.

Best New England Summer Events in 2017  – from the annual Best of New England travel guide, Yankee’s editors share their picks for the best New England summer events … 10 “best of” picks for each state. You can also sign up for a free travel guide.

2017 Events Calendar from VisitNewEngland.com, search by category of event or by date.

Discover New England – List of events and suggestions for things to do, as well as information about each state and a free New England Travel Guide.

New England Summer Festivals A to Z – 26 of the Best Summer Events in New England from tripsavvy

How to celebrate July 4 in New England – this is our post from last year, but most links are updated with 2017 information,

Folk Festivals in New England 

Historic New England Events

Best Summer Seafood Festivals in New England

Best Boston Events – Best festivals, fun things to do, weekend street fairs, kids activities, and free entertainment in Boston by month

New England’s Best Beaches – Town & Country Magazine

The best beaches in New England – Conde Nast Traveler

New England National Parks and Sites

55 Amazing New England Hikes – an interactive guide features everything from mapped locations, to difficulty levels – compiled by Boston Magazine.

Hikes New England

Bike New England – cycling routes & trails – including charity rides

10 Best Summer Road Trips in New England – Ready for a New England road trip? From back roads and small towns to coastal spots, these are the best summer road trips in New England.

Preventable deaths by age: A lifetime of risk


The news media often calls them “accidents” but the National Safety Council calls them “preventable deaths.” The upcoming months of July and August typically record the highest number of preventable deaths – primarily poisonings, car crashes, falls, drowning, choking and fires. And if you are surprised that poisonings are now topping the list, think about fatalities related opioids and other prescription drugs, which are spiking alarmingly in most regions of the country, displacing car crashes as a leading cause of accidental death.

June is National Safety Month, an annual observance sponsored by the National Safety Council. Take this quick interactive Safety Checkup to know your risks. We also liked the “lifetime of Risk” infographic (below) that maps out the highest risks for preventable deaths by age group.

National Safety Month
Provided by the National Safety Council

Gardening tips & tools for newbies


Whether for the joy of raising your own food and flowers, for increasing your home’s curb appeal, or just for the love of getting close to nature, gardening is a great seasonal pastime. If you are a beginning gardener, the trusty Farmer’s Almanac is a great source for gardening resources, from planners, calendars and videos to gardening tips by month for your location.

Even if you don’t have a lot of space – maybe only a balcony – you might try vertical gardening. The LA Times features a variety of kits and containers designed to help you maximize space and still yield beautiful greenery, flowers and even a crop of veggies.

If you don’t have a garden yourself, New England has a wide range of gardens that make for great seasonal outings. VisitNewEngland.com offers a garden guide, noting:

Public gardens of all types are found from one end of New England another. They range from formal and traditional, like the Elizabeth Park Rose Garden in Hartford, Connecticut, to the wide and whimsical, like the Coastal Maine Botanical Gardens in Boothbay, Maine. Rhododendrons bloom wild at a park in southern New Hampshire and butterflies have their own garden habitats in parts of Rhode Island and Massachusetts. In all the warm months, garden clubs host local garden tours of places as private and lavish as the homes of Newport, Rhode Island, and elsewhere.

Beginning gardeners – and even some pros – may find this infographic from TheFix.com on Essential Tools for Beginner Gardeners very helpful. The Be sure to click through for many helpful tips in the accompanying blog post.


Source: Fix.com Blog

Back to school toolkit for kids of all ages


back to schoolIt’s getting to be that time of year… back-to-school season! Over the years, we’ve posted lots of advice for parents and students of all ages. In this post, we’ll offer some of our best back-to-school posts, with a few new resources thrown in.

College planning

Kids heading off to college? Double check insurance coverage first – we talk about homeowners/renters, auto, ID theft, tuition insurance and stand-alone policies for electronics.

College survival guide: Safety tips, what to pack, dorm hacks – a handy list of checklists from safety & security to eating healthy in a dorm.

ID theft is on the upswing and college students are at high risk – common types of fraud, resources to avoid ID theft or deal with it if it happens, and information on identity theft insurance.

Rental Insurance for the College Graduate – we suggest this as a gift for recent graduates, but it is as valid for students who will be renting. The post talks about myths, checklists and what you need to know.

Kids at home – back to school

Tips from 60,000 pediatricians about back to school safety – this post focuses on safety issues around traveling back and forth to school. You can also click for an updated checklist of Back to School Tips from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Schoolbus safety tips

Backpack safety – there are a surprisingly high number injuries from overloaded back packs. Learn how to be sure your kids are not at risk.

Tips & tools for avoiding or dealing with the flu

Edutopia: Back to school resources for parents

PBS Parents: Back-to-School Tips for Parents

KidsHealth: Back to School – lots of advice for parents, or click through to get advice for kids, too.

Care.com: 101 Back-to-School Tips for Kids and Parents

Do you have any unclaimed money? Check to find out!


raining money

There’s a lot of frozen money out there that no one is claiming .. it’s in the billions. Some put the figure as high as $40 billion! Is any of it yours? Some of it could be if you’ve ever moved to another state or to another residence; if you’ve changed your name; if you’ve forgotten about a small bank account or a few shares of stock; or if a distant relative left you something in a life insurance policy or will.

Here are some of the most common forms of unclaimed money:

  • Inactive bank accounts, both checking and savings
  • Unfound life insurance or other account beneficiaries
  • Tax refunds that were misdirected
  • Unreturned utility deposits and escrow accounts
  • Refunds and credits
  • Stocks, mutual funds, bonds, and dividends
  • Uncashed checks and wages
  • Insurance policies, CDs, trust funds
  • Unredeemed money orders or travelers checks
  • Unclaimed safe deposit boxes

If you’d like to check to see if there is any unclaimed money due you, here’s a tip:
The best place to start is MissingMoney.com.

This site is the only only free, state endorsed national database of missing money. The site is officially endorsed by NAUPA (National Association of Unclaimed Property Administrators) and participating states and provinces. The site will assist you in thoroughly searching all participating states to find your family’s missing, lost, and unclaimed property, money and assets. It has the most updated information for the state and provincial offices. Searches and claiming are always FREE.

We tried it out and found a $65 insurance policy refund from a neighboring state we lived in more than 10 years ago. We filed a claim and the money will be sent to us. You can search the entire database or confine to a specific state. Don’t forget to search by any variations in your name. Here are some search tips and frequently asked questions.

Other resources for unclaimed money

While MissingMoney.com is the best site, you can also check these sources, too:

Scam alert – don’t get hooked

Beware of scams related to unclaimed money. While we’d all like to think that we won some money that we didn’t know about or have a distant wealthy deceased aunt who left us her fortune, it’s not likely to be true. Scammers thrive on our hopes, fantasies and greed – don’t give them the opportunity.

  • Beware of emails and phone calls that alert you to winnings or other unclaimed money. State and federal authorities do not use email or phone to notify you of unclaimed money. The IRS will never threaten you to “pay now or else.”
  • Beware of people who ask for bank or credit card information or personal details to process your winnings/inheritance.
  • Be careful of unauthorized search sites that charge a fee to use. Stick to the sites we’ve mentioned or call your state’s unclaimed money office or insurance bureau if you have questions.
  • Beware of people who try to charge you. While there are some legitimate finder businesses that search for lost property owners and offer to inform them of how to obtain their property for a fee, most “out of the blue” alerts should be treated with a high degree of suspicion. NAUPA recommends that “Before signing any contract from a firm of this type, we recommend that you be cautious and contact the unclaimed property office in your state for more information.” Plus, you are better running your own searches periodically and avoiding any fees!

Check out these scam alerts: