Survival toolkit for college students


One of the first student tips we offer is our post about college students and insurance. We also have a grab-bag of useful tools, advice, and college prep resources — a mini college survival reference guide. We cover everything from safety & security to dorm room advice, with tips from experts. Plus, we offer a variety of links to advice for how to eat healthy while in college, including recipes.

Safety & security

Campus Security Checklist

Security Safety Checklist

Campus and dorm fires

Campus and dorm fire safety tips

Common College scams

9 Ways to Stay Safe on Your College Campus

General college survival advice

Using College Checklists to Plan and Organize Move-in Weekend

What to Bring for Campus Living and How to Pack in 3 Easy Steps

List of Items Not to Bring to College: Dorm Room Contraband

Off-to-College Checklist

Surviving the College Life

36 Life Hacks Every College Student Should Know

First year tips

25 Tips to Help You Survive Your Freshman Year (PDF)

10 Tips To Survive Your First Year Of College

Your First Year of College: 25 Strategies and Tips to Help You Survive and Thrive Your Freshman Year and Beyond

42 College Tips I Learned Freshman Year

Healthy dining in the dorms

22 Healthy College Recipes You Can Make in Your Dorm Room

27 Ways To Eat Like An Adult In College

24 Easy Dorm Snacks for When You Want to Eat Healthier

10 Easy Ways to Eat Healthy in College (It’s Possible, We Promise!)

15 Essential Non-Perishable Foods to Keep In Your Dorm Room

College survival guide: Safety tips, what to pack, dorm hacks


Students walking on campus On University Campus

Recently, we posted about college students and insurance. Today, we have some additional college prep resources — sort of an all-purpose college survival guide. First and foremost we have links to several safety & security checklists because all the insurance in the world won’t help if you don’t make safety a priority. We also have links to what to pack guides, tips for first year students and advice for how to eat healthy while in college.

Campus Security Checklist

Security Safety Checklist

Campus and dorm fires

Campus and dorm fire safety tips

What to Bring for Campus Living and How to Pack in 3 Easy Steps

List of Items Not to Bring to College: Dorm Room Contraband

Off-to-College Checklist

10 Tips To Survive Your First Year Of College

Your First Year of College: 25 Strategies and Tips to Help You Survive and Thrive Your Freshman Year and Beyond

42 College Tips I Learned Freshman Year

27 Ways To Eat Like An Adult In College

10 Easy Ways to Eat Healthy in College (It’s Possible, We Promise!)

36 Life Hacks Every College Student Should Know

Kids heading off to college? Double check insurance coverage first


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If you have a child headed off to college, it’s time to check your current insurance policies and have a talk with your insurance agent to ensure your student has adequate protection.

Homeowners / renters insurance
If your student will be living in a dorm, their possessions may be covered by your homeowners policy for perils like fire, theft, vandalism and natural disasters such as a hurricane. But your coverage may have limits – the Insurance Information Institute (III) explains:

“Other policies may limit the amount of coverage for a college student’s belongings to 10 percent of the total amount of a policy’s overall coverage for personal possessions. So if parents have $100,000 worth of personal possessions insurance for the family’s primary residence, for example, only $10,000 would be applicable to possessions in their youngster’s dorm room.”

If your student has expensive electronic equipment, as many students do, you should check limits to ensure you have adequate coverage. Laptops, smartphones, tablets and TVs can add up! Plus, talk over cost/benefit scenarios related to deductibles with your agent. You want them high enough to keep insurance rates reasonable but not so high that it will create a hardship to replace a stolen laptop.

Not in a dorm? If students will be living in an apartment, your homeowners probably will not cover them. Renters insurance is inexpensive and may be the best bet. See our recent post that covers myths and misconceptions about renters insurance.

Auto insurance
If your student is under the age of 25 and college is within 100 miles of your home, he or she may be covered by your policy. If further than 100 miles away, the student still may be covered on your policy if they only drive while visiting your home. If your student will only be driving while on college breaks, talk to your agent to see if this could help to lower rates – you may be able to get a discount.

If your student will be 100+ miles away with a car, a separate policy may be required. Talk to your agent to determine the best option for your situation. III also suggests checking to see if your student is eligible for any “good student” discounts or whether safe driver training programs could reduce rates.

Tuition Insurance
Check to see what the college refund policy is. If tuition is very high, you may want to talk to your agent about a specialty tuition reimbursement insurance coverage that would kick in if the student had to leave school due to an unforeseen illness or physical disability – or in the event of the student’s death. Typically, these plans do not provide reimbursement for students who are expelled or who decide to leave the college for other reasons.

Identity theft insurance
Students are at high risk for identity theft. You may want to educate them about safety concerns and it might be worth investing in an ID theft protection product.

Stand-alone coverage for electronics

III suggests this option: “Parents may want to look into acquiring stand-alone policies for desktop computers, laptops, tablets and iPads, and other electronics as they may provide coverage against accidental damage, liquid spills and other events not included under a standard homeowners or renters policy. Keep in mind that if you are using a credit card to buy such items, some insurance protection may also be available through the card itself.”

Consider Renters Insurance as a Gift for Graduates


This is a guest post by Penny Hanley & Howley Co., a Renaissance Alliance member agency. It is a post that was previously featured on the Agency’s Blog.
happy-graduate.jpg
Will your graduating students be coming back to the nest, or considering renting their own place?
This is a wonderful time in your student’s life. Graduation from college brings on so many new adventures to look forward to. One of which can include whether they will be renting their own apartment after graduation. With some many decisions to process after graduation, make the easiest one there is for your student who will be moving to their first apartment-Renters Insurance.
Purchasing Renters Insurance for your student is a gift of security for them and yourself. You’ll be putting your mind at ease knowing that your students first apartment is protected in case of fire or theft.
An average Renters policy runs around $200 a year for the basic $20,000 in coverage, that’s only $16 a month for your piece of mind and security of your student’s new apartment.
So when considering what gift to give your student for graduation this year, give them a protection policy with Renters Insurance.

Tips from 60,000 pediatricians about back to school safety


The American Academy of Pediatrics has issued a helpful back to school safety tip sheet. We’re reprinting the safety tips that deal with traveling to and from school and vehicle safety.
School Bus Safety

  • If your child’s school bus has lap/shoulder seat belts, make sure your child uses one at all times when in the bus. If your child’s school bus does not have lap/shoulder belts, encourage the school to buy or lease buses with lap/shoulder belts.
  • Wait for the bus to stop before approaching it from the curb.
  • Do not move around on the bus.
  • Check to see that no other traffic is coming before crossing the street.
  • Make sure to always remain in clear view of the bus driver.
  • Children should always board and exit the bus at locations that provide safe access to the bus or to the school building.

Car Safety

  • All passengers should wear a seat belt and/or an age- and size-appropriate car safety seat or booster seat.
  • Your child should ride in a car safety seat with a harness as long as possible and then ride in a selt-positioning booster seat. Your child is ready for a booster seat when she has reached the top weight or height allowed for her seat, her shoulders are above the top harness slots, or her ears have reached the top of the seat.
  • Your child should ride in a belt-positioning booster seat until the vehicle’s seat belt fits properly (usually when the child reaches about 4′ 9″ in height and is between 8 to 12 years of age). This means that the child is tall enough to sit against the vehicle seat back with her legs bent at the knees and feet hanging down and the shoulder belt lies across the middle of the chest and shoulder, not the neck or throat; the lap belt is low and snug across the thighs, and not the stomach.
  • All children younger than 13 years of age should ride in the rear seat of vehicles. If you must drive more children than can fit in the rear seat (when carpooling, for example), move the front-seat passenger’s seat as far back as possible and have the child ride in a booster seat if the seat belts do not fit properly without it.
  • Remember that many crashes occur while novice teen drivers are going to and from school. You should require seat belt use, limit the number of teen passengers, do not allow eating, drinking, cell phone conversations or texting to prevent driver distraction; and limit nighttime driving and driving in inclement weather. Familiarize yourself with your state’s graduated driver license law and consider the use of a parent-teen driver agreement to facilitate the early driving learning process. For a sample parent-teen driver agreement, see www.healthychildren.org/teendriver

Bike Safety

  • Always wear a bicycle helmet, no matter how short or long the ride.
  • Ride on the right, in the same direction as auto traffic.
  • Use appropriate hand signals.
  • Respect traffic lights and stop signs.
  • Wear bright color clothing to increase visibility.
  • Know the “rules of the road.”

Walking to School

  • Make sure your child’s walk to a school is a safe route with well-trained adult crossing guards at every intersection.
  • Be realistic about your child’s pedestrian skills. Because small children are impulsive and less cautious around traffic, carefully consider whether or not your child is ready to walk to school without adult supervision.
  • If your children are young or are walking to a new school, walk with them the first week or until you are sure they know the route and can do it safely.
  • Bright colored clothing will make your child more visible to drivers.
  • In neighborhoods with higher levels of traffic, consider starting a “walking school bus,” in which an adult accompanies a group of neighborhood children walking to school.