Snow storm damage? III has the scoop


clearing snow

After you’re done digging out from the snow today, are you safe in putting the shovels and  scrapers away yet? Probably not – New England weather is full of surprises. Yesterday’s storm was billed as late in the season, but many New Englanders recall the infamous 1997 April Fool’s Day Blizzard, which deposited 25.4″ at Boston’s Logan Airport. And in 1977, on May 10, Worcester accumulated almost 13″ of snow, while Providence saw about 7″. And then there is the historic 1816, dubbed the year without summer, that recorded snow in June.

In terms of snow totals overall, the 2014-2015 snow season is the record breaker, with 110.6 inches in Boston; Lowell and Worcester both came in at about 120 inches for the season.

While yesterday’s storm proved less intense in some areas than predicted, there were hours of heavy, damaging wind and the coast was battered. Many communities saw power outages, and some people are coping with storm related property damage today.

Claire Wilkinson of the Insurance Information Institute’s blog has a handy run-down: Winter Storm Damage? Insurers Have You Covered, discussing damages that are typically covered by auto policies and homeowners policies. The good news is that typical homeowners policies cover most home-related storm damage with a few exceptions.

One exception is flooding, which would include melting snow seeping into the cellar. Flooding is not typically covered by Homeowners, you need a specific flood coverage, a separate policy. See our prior post: Does homeowners insurance cover flooding?

While flooding from a burst pipes or ice dams would generally be covered, Wilkinson notes that in the event of burst pipes, “there is generally a requirement that the homeowner has taken reasonable steps to prevent these losses by keeping the house warm and properly maintaining the pipes and drains.”

If you do need to file a homeowners claim for storm damage, here’s some advice: Putting in a homeowners claim? … Talk your agent first!

And also from the Insurance Information Institute, here is a brief overview of the steps for filing a home insurance claim.

Snow day toolkit: Shoveling, sharing the road with plows & more


Snow day! Despite many closures in anticipation of a fast-moving storm today, some people still need to be out and about, and most of us will need to deal with the subsequent cleanup. We’ve ferreted through our archives to find some of the best tips we’ve found on cealing wiht the snow safely. And to get you in the spirit, we’re offering a few interesting snow related clips:

Here’s a mesmerizing extreme snow removal video that may make you feel better about a measly 8-14 inches

Snow shoveling 101: Best shovels, best techniques

Sharing the road with snow plows & more winter driving tips

Take care: Shoveling snow can kill or injure you

Snow shoveling and snow removal safety

And after it’s over:
Snowmageddon: Is your roof at risk of collapse?

Beat the Extreme Heat Tools!


With oppressive heat and humidity in the forecast for the Northeast today and through this weekend, we’ll all be looking for ways to beat the heat. If you’ll be working or playing outside, it’s really important to slow down, take precautions and know the signs of heat illness. Plus, you might also want to keep a close eye on kids and check in on any elderly relatives or neighbors who live alone. If they don’t have AC, they might get relief at a nearby senior center.

This handy chart helps you to know the signs of heat exertion and heat stroke.

zHeat_IllnessThe Massachusetts Emergency Management Agency has some good Extreme Heat Safety Tips, with suggestions for what to do to prepare for and deal with extreme heat. Also, see the infographic below.

It might be a great weekend for movies, museums, libraries, malls and other air conditioned public or entertainment places. It’s a good time to get ahead of your back-to-school shopping. If you plan to visit an outdoor pool or swimming hole to beat the heat, be prepared to take cover – there’s also chance of strong late afternoon or early evening thunderstorms.Heavy rain can also cause flash flooding in some low areas.

Should you have any power outages – a real possibility between the high demand on power grids and electrical storms  –  check with local authorities for cooling centers or heat shelters.

Here are state emergency resources to keep handy:

 

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Snowmageddon: Is your roof at risk of collapse?


After the unprecedented series of record-breaking snowstorms, we’re hearing some reports of roofs collapsing under the weight of the snow. One of our insurance partners, The Hanover, posted this persuasive graphic on their Twitter feed comparing the cost of a roof replacement vs a roof rake.

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That’s pretty convincing, but how do you know if your home or business is at risk? The Insurance Institute for Business & Home Safety has a great infographic (below) along with an informative post on Four Steps to Identify and Address Roof Risks from Heavy Snow – it offers tips for how to identify and assess your risk and how to address problems safely. It’s well worth a read, particularly since forecasters say there may be more snow in our future this week!

This has got to end someday, right? When it does, keep this resource handy:
Responding to Flooding When Snow and Ice Melt

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Take care: Shoveling snow can kill or injure you


“Shoveling lots of wet, heavy snow presents a real risk of heart attack if you’re not in shape to do it. And musculoskeletal injuries are even more common.” That’s a reminder from Lenny Bernstein, who offers excellent tips for shoveling safely in the Washington Post. The following short video accompanies his tips.

We also really like this great tip list from Roy Berendsohn of Popular Mechanics: 16 Cardinal Rules for Snow Shoveling. Roy also offers a handy guide to help you to choose the best tool for the type of conditions and the task: Which Snow Shovel Is the Best?

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