How to ensure a safe boating season!


boating safety graphic

 

As we head into prime boating season, The National Safe Boating Council’s Wear It campaign offers some important safety messages. Check out these stats from the U.S. Coast Guard’s 2016 Recreational Boating Statistics, the most recent report. The stats are a compilation of data from 50 states.

  • 83% of boat drowning victims were not wearing a life jacket
  • 77% of deaths occurred on boats where the operator had no boating safety instruction
  • 15% of the deaths involved alcohol as the leading factor
  • Two-thirds of drowning victims are good swimmers
  • 4,463 boating accidents occurred, up 7.3% from the prior year
  • 701 deaths occurred, up 12% from prior year
  • 2,903 injuries, 11.1% increase
  • $49 million dollars of property damage

One of the primary safety messages is Wear It: no matter what type of boating activity to you are involved in, wear a safety belt yourself and require all your passengers to wear one, too. It’s the single most effective safety measure you can take. For more on boating safety, download a copy of Boating Safety Tips from the National Safe Boating Council, which we’re reprinted below. We added some links to the tips, as well.

1. Wear a life jacket. No matter what activity you have planned on the water, always remember to wear a life jacket every time you are on the water. Accidents on the water can happen much too fast to reach and put on a stowed life jacket. Life jacket types, fit and care.

2. Make sure your life jacket is U.S. Coast Guard approved, appropriate for your water activity and fits properly. A life jacket that is too large or too small can cause different situational problems. How to choose the right life jacket (PDF).

3. Know state boating laws. Rules and laws can differ from state to state and violations can result in ticketing, fines or jail time. State Boating Laws.

4. Take a boating safety course. Learn valuable tips that can help save your life in unexpected situations by taking a NASBLA (National Association of Boating Law Administrators) approved boating safety course. Many courses are online, and will save you money on your boat insurance. US Coast Guard – Boating Safety Courses.

5. Make sure your boat is prepared. There are many items that need to be check ed and rechecked on any boat. Schedule a Vessel Safety Check with your local U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary or U.S. Power Squadrons before you hit the water. Every Vessel Safety Check is conducted 100 percent free of charge. U.S. Coast Guard’s Vessel Checks.

6. Be sure to know your boat’s capacity. If you have too much on your boat, the boat may become unstable and capsize.

7. Check the weather, including the water temperature. Know the latest marine weather forecast prior to going out, and keep a regular check for changing conditions. National Weather Service Marine Forecast.

8. Dress properly. Always dress for the weather, wearing layers if cooler weather, and bring an extra set of clothes in case you get wet.

9. Always file a float plan. File a float plan with someone you trust that includes details about the trip, boat, persons, towing or trailer vehicle, communication equipment and emergency contacts. Find out more and get resources at the Coast Guard’s Float Plan Central.

10. Always follow navigation rules. Know the “Rules of the Road” such as operator’s responsibility, maintaining a proper lookout, safe speed, crossing, meeting head-on and overtaking situations. Know what’s going on around you at all times, and always travel at safe speeds for the environment. Find out more about navigation rules at Boat on Course from the National Safe Boating Council.

11. Don’t drink while you boat. Where the primary cause was known, alcohol was listed as the leading factor in 15 percent of deaths in 2016. Find out more at Operation Dry Water from the National Association of State Boating Law Administrators.

12. Beware of carbon monoxide poisoning. Gasoline-powered engines on boats, including onboard generators, produce carbon monoxide (CO), a colorless and odorless gas that can poison or kill someone who breathes too much of it. Be sure to install
and maintain a working CO detector, never block exhaust outlets, and always dock, beach or anchor at least 20 feet away from the nearest boat that is running a generator or engine. Learn more at Prevent Carbon Monoxide Poisoning on Your Boat from the CDC.

13. Keep in touch. Communication devices can be the most important piece of emergency equipment on board a vessel, especially in case of emergency. Be sure to have at least two communication devices that work when wet, such as satellite phones, emergency position indicating radio beacons (EPIRB), VHF radios and personal locator beacons (PLB). Cell phones are not reliable in an emergency situation.

More boating safety resources

 

 

Prepping your RV for summer travel & camping


It’s almost time to hit the road! Before you pack up the family into the RV for a spring camping vacation, take the time to get your winterized RV ready for the warm weather. A thorough once-over will keep your RV running smoothly and give you peace of mind on those long drives.

Have you talked to your independent insurance agent about insurance coverage for your RV? Depending on the type of RV and whether or not it is financed, you may or may not need separate insurance coverage from your auto. But even if you are not required by law or by your financing company, it’s  a big investment so it makes sense to talk over coverage options and to know your choices.

Below are a few checklists to help you get your vehicle ready for adventure. They cover everything from preventative maintenance to tips for packing safely and efficiently. Don’t forget the fishing poles!


Source: Fix.com Blog

Time to prep that swimming pool for safety!


little girls in the swimming pool

Is it too early to think about going swimming yet? We’ve certainly earned warm weather after a snowy, chilly start to spring. Swimming season can’t be far away!

But if you own a backyard pool, whether of the in-ground or above-ground variety, you know that before the fun starts there’s some work to do. Your pool needs to be in swimsuit-shape, too!

A call to your local swimming pool service will do some of the work for you – their trained technicians can clean, fill, and maintain your pool. But there are a host of issues involved with pool ownership that you, the pool owner, will need to consider.

Some of those issues regard insurance. If you’ve just installed a new swimming pool or purchased your first property with a swimming pool, you might not be aware of the implications of swimming pool ownership.

Familiarize yourself with local standards regarding swimming pools to make sure you are in compliance. Certain municipalities may require fencing, locked gates, decks, and accessible pool safety equipment.

You’re also going to need insurance. Call your local insurance agent and ask her to lay out the different kinds of insurance available. Swimming pools are considered an “attractive nuisance” by the insurance industry and they will increase your liability. So upping your liability insurance is generally a good idea. Consider an umbrella liability policy for extended coverage. Make sure your coverage includes the cost to repair or replace the swimming pool should it be damaged in a natural disaster.

There are simple steps you can take to make your swimming pool safer and reduce your risk. Create a barrier to prevent unauthorized access to your pool. A wall, a fence, locked gates, alarms on doors leading to the pool – all of these measures will help to dissuade uninvited guests from taking a quick dip.

It’s also good to know some details about your swimming pool. Know how to remove and change pool filters, and how to shut the pumps off in an emergency. Know how to install, clean, and maintain drain covers. Enroll yourself and your family members in a water safety class and teach your children to swim as soon as possible.

There’s lots of good suggestions regarding pool safety out there. Here’s a good place to start: PoolSafety.gov. Also, The National Swimming Pool Foundation offers a reasonably-priced 2-hour online training on Home Pool Essentials that comes with a 30-page guide.

Fire extinguishers: What you need to know from A to K


portable fire extinguisher

What’s a piece of kitchen equipment that  every cook should have handy and know how to use, but hopes to never need?

A fire extinguisher.

There are a few different types of fire extinguishers. Some are meant for specialized situations, others for more general use. All are classified by two criteria: their mechanism of action, and the types of fires they are meant to extinguish. So first we’ll look at how fires themselves are classified.

According to the Fire Equipment Manufacturers’ Association, there are five types of fires, broken down by fuel source:

  • Class A fires are your regular old fires, started by heat hitting a combustible solid material such as wood, cloth, paper, trash, or plastic.
  • Class B fires spark from flammable liquids or gases, like gasoline,paint, butane,and propane.
  • Class C fires involve powered electrical equipment such as appliances, motors, and transformers. When the electrical power is shut off, these fires become one of the other types of fires.
  • Class D fires are a special group of conflagrations caused by combustible metals like sodium, potassium, magnesium, and aluminum.
  • Class K fires (why K? Because K is for Kitchen!) are fueled by cooking oils and grease from animal or vegetable fats.

Some fire extinguishers are useful in putting out more than one type of fire. Others are more specialized and will have warning labels advising of their proper use.

A fire needs four elements: heat, oxygen, a fuel source, and a chemical reaction. Remove any one of those four and you’ve snuffed that fire. That’s what different fire extinguishers do. Some remove heat. Others take away oxygen. Still others are best at interrupting the chemical reaction causing the blaze.

These are the basic types of fire extinguishers:

  • Water and Foam: these fire extinguishers work by removing heat. Foam-based extinguishers also inhibit the fire’s access to oxygen. Water extinguishers are for Class A fires only. They are NOT for use on Class B or Class C fires – spraying a water extinguisher on a fire caused by a flammable liquid could cause the fire to spread, or in the case of a Class C fire, create the risk of electrical shock.
  • Carbon Dioxide: these extinguishers put out fires by taking away the blaze’s source of oxygen. Their very cold discharge also removes heat.
  • Dry Chemical: these multi-purpose extinguishers are effective on Class A, Class B, and Class C fires. They work by interrupting the chemical reaction creating the fire. They’re the most common type of fire extinguisher found in the home. Some ordinary dry chemical fire extinguishers are designed to put out Class B and Class C fires only; always read the warning label and recommendations before deciding on the right fire extinguisher for your needs.
  • Wet Chemical: by removing heat and creating a barrier between the oxygen and fuel sources feeding the fire, wet chemical fire extinguishers are highly effective against Class K fires, specifically the fires caused by modern,high-efficiency deep-fat fryers found in commercial systems. This is the type of fire-suppression system installed beneath the hoods in many restaurants and commercial kitchens. While also effective in fighting Class A fires, wet chemical fire-extinguishing are generally only used in commercial and industrial applications.
  • Halogenated or Clean Agent: these extinguishers interrupt the chemical processes causing the fire. They’re effective versus Class B and Class C fires.
  • Dry Powder: a specialized type of fire extinguisher used only for putting out Class D fires. Similar to dry chemical extinguishers, but  designed only for putting out combustible metal fires. Not for home use.
  • Water Mist: these relatively new fire extinguishers are designed to replace halogenated extinguishers in situations where contamination is a pressing concern. They remove heat and are most effective against Class A fires.
  • Cartridge-Operated Dry Chemical: like their dry chemical cousins,these fire extinguishers work by interrupting the chemical reaction causing the fire. They can be effective against Class A, Class B, and Class C fires, though ordinary cartridge-operated dry chemical fire extinguishers are most effective in staunching Class B and Class C blazes. Again, always reads the warming labels and buy the fire extinguisher best-suited for your situation.

To learn more about fire extinguishers, check out the Fire Equipment Manufacturers’ Association.

Wildfire Community Preparedness Day, May 5, 2018


wildfire preparation day graphic

In many parts of the US, wildfires are a constant threat. Wildfires destroy homes and property, injure and kill people and animals, and disrupt lives. We New Englanders tend to think of wildfires as only happening in the west, but that is not true. While less frequent and less damaging, there are indeed wildfires in New England. There are still some old-timers who remember a devastating Maine fire 70 years ago that destroyed towns and burned about a quarter of a million acres. People literally ran into the ocean to escape the flames.  New England’s severe drought a few year’s ago was a prime condition for wildfires.

May 5, the first Saturday in May, is Wildfire Community Preparation Day. Wherever you live, it’s a great opportunity to pitch in and help your community prepare for wildfires and a good reminder to look over your family’s own fire-preparedness plan.

So get the word out May 5: being properly prepared for wildfires is your best defense.

Preparation against wildfires is a matter of taking a few simple steps:

  • Get the most out of your smartphone. Get community weather alerts. Install the FEMA app or sign up for the Emergency Alert System.
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Radio also provides emergency alerts.
  • Know your evacuation route, and have a plan B. And even a plan C. You don’t always know which exit will be passable. Make plans for your pets and livestock, too.Have your bug-out bag packed. Keep a number of N95 respirator masks handy. These sub-$20 face masks will alleviate the threat from inhaled ash, grit, and other particulates.
  • Store your important documents in a fire-proof safe, and have password-protected back-ups of your data.
  • Make sure the hose will reach. You want to be able to soak every inch of your property with it.
  • Build with fire-resistant materials. Know the properties of the materials you’re using to build, renovate, and repair your home and outbuildings.
  • Make a firebreak. Keep flammable material such as leaves, firewood, and debris at least thirty feet away from your home.
  • Keep your insurance coverage up to date. If you’ve made renovations or additions to your property, let your insurance agent know. Go over all your insurance coverages with your agent once a year to make sure they’re up-to-date and suites to your current needs.

Fire safety works best when everyone collaborates. Get together with your friends and family on May 5 and make your community safer from wildfires.