Your Super Bowl pre-game tool kit


Super Bowl party ingredients: snacks, beer, a football and a remote

Another Super Bowl Sunday for the Patriots! Go New England! We’ve gathered a grab bag of fun and interesting related items from around the web to get you in the spirit.

The Philadelphia police are hard at work greasing the street poles to prevent Eagles fans from any wild post-game pole-climbing activities. Sports Illustrated says they started with Crisco but are now using gear oil. But their precautions are likely in vain if we can believe the apes. In an annual tradition, Utah’s Hogle Zoo primates Tuah and Arcara made their Super Bowl LII predictions for the winning team … and they chose the Patriots. But let’s check in with other experts in the animal kingdom. Teddy the Porcupine has a 5-1 record for being right in his prognostications. Check out who he favors this year.

This year, the Globe and Philly.com are partnering to bring you a series of Facebook Live reports from the Super Bowl. The schedule started yesterday and will continue through the weekend – you can watch them all on the Globe’s Facebook page. And if Twitter is your thing, here’s what’s happening on Twitter for Super Bowl 52.

To get you in the spirit, Masslive has a Belichick feature: “Whether it be his references to SnapFace, his dry humor or his less-than-enthusiastic responses to numerous questions from the media, New England Patriots head coach Bill Belichick is often good for a number of memorable moments at the podium every season.” They offer a choice selection of Belichick’s best quotes, jokes and press conferences from this season.

How are you at Super Bowl trivia? take the test to find out. You might want to brush up on these 23 pieces of fascinating Super Bowl trivia before the game so that you can amaze your companions.

If you look forward to the Super Bowl ads but don’t like sacrificing your time to replenish snacks or drinks, you’re in luck – AdAge brings you All the 2018 Super Bowl Ads Released So Far.

Many people think that the Super Bowl is really for the dogs, and they’ll prove it by tuning in to Puppy Bowl XIII on Sunday. Not to be outdone by the canine, kittens are taking to the field in Kitten Bowl 5.

Plan your day – here’s the lineup:

  • Kitten Bowl at noon, ET
  • Puppy Bowl 3 PM, ET
  • Super Bowl 6 PM, ET

Super Bowl parties

Planning a Super Bowl party but haven’t set the menu yet? Here’s a how-to on building a Super Bowl snack stadium, and here are 126 Amazing Super Bowl Party Foods That Are Guaranteed To Score.

But if you are hosting a party, we issue a reminder to look after guest safety to avoid any host liability. The Insurance Information Institute explains:

Social host liability, also known as “Dram Shop Liability” laws vary widely from state to state, but 43 states have them on the books. Most of these laws also offer an injured person, such as the victim of a drunk driver, a method to sue the person who served the alcohol. There are circumstances under these laws where criminal charges may also apply.

It’s a little late for this Super Bowl, but if you are a homeowner who likes to host parties, you might want to talk to your independent insurance agent about umbrella liability insurance, which increases your protection.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration reminds everyone that Fans Don’t Let Fans Drive Drunk, and offering sensible tips for party-goers and hosts.

Parents of toddlers take note: Prevent tip-over accidents in your home


child at risk of a furniture tipover

Can you spot what’s wrong with the picture in this post? If you have young children or know someone who does, the photo should set off warning alarms – but unfortunately, many people just aren’t cued in to the danger of furniture tipovers. For example, there was an important recall notice from IKEA that you might have missed over the holidays. After an 8th child died in a tip-over accident, IKEA re-issued its recall notice for Malm dressers. A 2-year old California boy died after being trapped under an unanchored 3-drawer chest.

Furniture tipovers pose a risk that goes well beyond IKEA. Every year in the U.S., more than 25,000 children are treated in emergency rooms for tip-over accidents and about one child dies every 2-3 weeks from these types of preventable home accidents. Most tipovers – about 80% – involve young children, from 1 to 5 years old. They happen in bedrooms and living rooms and involve chests, drawers, bookshelves, armoires, TVs and other unanchored furnishings tipping onto, trapping and crushing children. The little boy in the photo above is in a hazardous situation. A post on the CPSC On Safety blog explains the importance of anchoring children’s furniture.

In this video clip, a Mom speaks about what happened to her son Shane and offers advice to parent so that they can avoid such a tragedy.

You can also see a video of a near-miss involving twin boys who suffered a tip-over but fortunately escaped serious injury. The parents posted the chilling video online to warn other parents by showing how quickly and easily such incidents can occur when furnishings are unanchored.

We’ve posted on the topic of tip-overs several times. For additional information see our past posts and these other helpful links:

Seasonal Toy Safety Tips and 10 Worst Toys for 2017


children playing with toys to illustrate toy safety

It’s not all fun and games when it comes to toys. In 2016, there were 174,100 children under the age of 15 treated at emergency departments for toy-related injuries; seven children died. The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) recently issued its seasonal toy safety alerts.

Here are their 2017 safety recommendations:

  • Check the label: Choose age appropriate toys by reading the age label on the toy. Children younger than 3 should not have access to toys with small parts, which can cause choking. Also avoid marbles and small balls for children under 3.
  • Get safety gear. With scooters and other riding toys, supervision is key along with proper safety gear that includes helmets. Helmets should be worn properly at all times and they should be sized to fit. Avoid riding a scooter on a street or roadway with other motor vehicles.
  • Hoverboards: Although not considered a toy, hoverboards should be compliant with UL 2272 safety standard.
  • Be careful with magnets: High powered magnet sets are dangerous and should be kept away from children under 14. Building and play sets with small magnets should also be kept away from small children.

The 10 Worst Toys for 2017

The World Against Toys Causing Harm (W.A.T.C.H.) also recently released its 10 Worst Toys for 2017 list – check out the slide show with photos so you can recognize the toys, some of which would definitely have appeal. It’s particularly important to be alert about avoiding recalled toys online. The W.A.T.C.H. report says that the Internet is like the Wild West when it comes to outlawed toys and that shoppers should not assume that any safeguards are in place:

Regulations and safety protocols for e-commerce transactions are often nonexistent or inadequate. Consumer-to-consumer “second-hand sales”— which are inconsistently monitored, if monitored at all — provide new opportunities for recalled toys to surface.

W.A.T.C.H. offers a list of Toy Hazards to Watch Out For as well as recent Consumer Product Safety Commission Recalls.

Prevent home heating fires with these tips from the pros


two pairso f stockinged feet before a fireplace

As the temperature drops, home fire risk rises. It just makes sense. While cooking fires are the leading cause of residential fires, heating-related fires come in second place and peak in the month of January. The U.S. Fire Administration recently issued two statistical reports that talk about home heating fires. In their Study of Heating Fires in Residential Buildings (2013-2015), they report that:

  • Approximately 45,900 annual heating fires in U.S. residential buildings were reported to fire departments each year.
  • Annually, heating fires resulted in 200+ deaths, 700+ injuries, and more than half a billion dollars in property loss.
  • Residential heating fires peak in the early evening from 5 to 9 p.m., accounting for 29% of heating-related home fires.
  • Confined fires (fires confined to chimneys, flues or fuel burners) accounted for 75% percent of residential building heating fires.
  • Combustible materials that were too close to the heat source accounted for 29% of non-confined fires.

While only 4% of heating fires in residential buildings involved portable heaters, they were  involved in 43% of fatal home heating fires, a statistic that should give some pause. In the USFA study on Portable Heater Fires in Residential Buildings (2013-2015), they report:

  • Annual estimated occurrence: 1,650 portable heater fires in residential
  • Portable heater fires caused an estimated 90 deaths, 175 injuries, and $84 million in property loss.
  • In 54% of the fires, the heat source was too close to combustible objects
  • About 37% of portable heater fires started in bedrooms.
  • In bedroom fires caused by portable heaters, the leading items ignited (23%) were bedding, such as blankets, sheets, and comforters.

Here’s a short USFA safety clip related to portable heaters.

Heating safety tips

Fire prevention experts say there are many practices you can take to reduce your risk of a heating-related fire in your home. Here are few safety tips we’ve compiled from the experts

Practice the 3-foot safety rule. Keep combustible materials away from the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heater.

Maintain a “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters. Again, 3 feet is the recommended distance.,

Inspect, clean and test. Have qualified heating professionals inspect and clean furnaces, chimneys and heating equipment every year. Replace batteries in your fire alarms in the spring and fall, and test smoke alarms at least once a month.

Turn off portable heaters when you go to bed or leave a room. Get more space heater safety tips from Travelers,

Never, never, never use ovens or portable grills to heat your home.

Fireplace safety:

  • Use a good quality screen to prevent sparks from jumping.
  • Dispose of ashes in a metal, non-flammable container when they are cold.
  • Dispose of ashes a safe distance away from your home – never beside the home or in the garage or cellar.
  • Learn more about how to dispose of ashes properly – and get a few tips on handy uses for the ash.

Related: see our recent post with money-saving home heating ideas:

Winterizing: Money saving ideas for heating your home

Fire up that snowblower – don’t wait until the first storm hits


We had our first snowfall of the season yesterday … OK, depending on where you live, it was only a few wimpy flakes. But take it as Mother Nature’s gentle advance warning: Winter is on it’s way – get your snowblower ready.

If you have a snowblower, take it out of storage now and test it out – you don’t want to get caught short in the first storm. Popular Mechanics has some tips for how to start your snowblower – including some tips for blowers that are stubborn about starting.

If you don’t have a snowblower, but you have one on your Santa wish list, this video offers  snowblower buying guide tips from Consumer Reports. It’s interactive so you can skip to different chapters. Learn about which type of snow blower best suits your property. The video breaks down what you need to know about size, power source – gas, battery or electric -, key features, trouble shooting, maintenance and how to ensure a smooth start-up each season.

Operating your snowblower safely

Every year, emergency rooms see about 6,000 injuries related to snow blower accidents, many of them amputations. Experts say that most snowblower injuries occur when snow is heavy, wet and deeper than 6 inches – those are conditions that lead to clogging in snow removal machines. Most injuries are hand injuries to the dominant hand.

Whether you are operating a snowblower for your home or your business, the Outdoor Power & Equipment Institute (OPEI) urges you to operate your snow blowing equipment safely. They offer a great list of tips for preparing your machine before it snows, and the following snow blowing safety tips:

  • KEY SAFETY TIP: Never put your hands inside the auger or chute. Use a clean out tool (or stick) to unclog snow or debris from your snow thrower. Your hands should never go inside the auger or chute.
  • Turn OFF your snow thrower if you need to clear a clog. If you need to remove debris or unclog snow, always turn off your snow thrower. Wait for all moving parts to come to a complete stop before clearing any clogs or debris.
  • Only use your snow thrower in visible conditions. Never operate the snow thrower without good visibility or light.
  • Aim your snow thrower with care. Never throw snow toward people or cars. Do not allow anyone to stand in front of your snow thrower. Keep children or pets away from your snow thrower when it is operating.
  • Use extreme caution on slopes and hills. Use caution when changing directions on slopes. Do not attempt to clear steep slopes.
  • Know where your cord is. If you have an electric powered snow thrower, be aware of where the power cord is at all times. Avoid tripping. Do not run over the power cord.
  • Keep pets and children inside. Kids and pets may love to play in the white stuff, but it’s best to keep them inside your home and under supervision while you are using your snow thrower to clear a path or drive. Do not allow them to play in the snow as it is tossed out of the snow thrower’s chute.

If you like to remove your snow the old-fashioned manual way, be sure to see our prior post on Snow shoveling 101: Best shovels, best techniques.