Dangerous toys: Check these 2018 toy safety reports and tips


young boy with Christmas toys

Don’t let your children’s holiday toy wishlist turn scary this year: every 3 minutes, a child is treated in an emergency room for a toy-related injury. As you compile your holiday shopping list, take some time to check the list online against reviews and product safety reports. And a good place to start are the seasonal safety reports that various consumer safety groups issue.

The Worst Toys for 2018

The World Against Toys Causing Harm (W.A.T.C.H.)  recently released its 10 Worst Toys for 2018 report. They say that, “… toys like the “Power Rangers Super Ninja Steel Superstar Blade” and “Marvel Black Panther Slash Claw,” should not be in the hands of children.” This year’s toy report addresses the types of toy hazards available online and in retail stores so parents know what deadly traps to avoid when buying toys. In addition to their press release linked above, check out the slide show with photos so you can recognize the toys, some of which would have strong “kid appeal.”

W.A.T.C.H. offers the following toy safety tips:

Watch out …

  • for Toys Marketed On The Internet, without warnings, instructions or age recommendations posted on the website.
  • for Battery Operated Toys For Children Under 8 Years Of Age since batteries may leak, overheat and explode.
  • for Toys With “Fur” Or “Hair”, including dolls and stuffed animals, that can be ingested and aspirated by oral age children.
  • for Toys With Small Removable Attachments at the end of laces and strings (e.g., bells, knobs, etc.).
  • for Projectile Toys, including dart guns, sling shots, and pea-shooters which shoot objects and can cause eye injuries and often blindness.
  • for Toys With Pointed Tips, And Blunt Or Sharp Edges that could crush, cut or puncture children’s skin.
  • for Toys With Strings Longer Than 6 Inches which could strangle small children.for Any Crib Or Playpen Toys which are to be strung across cribs or playpens. This type of toy has resulted in strangulation deaths and injuries.
  • for Toys Marketed With Other Product Lines, such as food, clothing, books, cassettes and videos which could have dangerous designs and are often sold with no warnings, instructions or age recommendations.
  • for Toys Composed Of Flammable Material which will readily ignite when exposed to heat or flame.
  • for Realistic Looking Toy Weapons including guns, dart guns, Ninja weaponry, swords, toy cleavers, knives, and crossbows which promote violence.
  • for Toys Which Require Electricity to function and do not have step-down transformers to reduce risk of shock and electrocution.
  • for Toys With Small Parts that can be swallowed or aspirated, causing choking.
  • for Long Handled Toys For Children Up To 4 Years Of Age due to a tendency of such children to place these toys in their mouths and choke.
  • for Toys With Toxic Surfaces Or Components that have the potential to be ingested or cause skin irritations (e.g., some children’s’ play make up kits have components which contain ferrocyanide, a known poison).

CPSC Report for 2018

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission also issued a toy safety report for 2018. It says that asphyxiation or choking are two of the most common injury hazards. It is not just important to buy safe toys, it’s also important to supervise children when they use toys. Here are some of their safety tips issued this year, with a few from past years:

  • Magnets – Children’s magnetic toys are covered by a strong safety standard that prevents magnets from being swallowed. High-powered magnet sets that have small magnets are dangerous and should be kept away from children. Whether marketed for children or adults, building and play sets with small magnets should also be kept away from small children.
  • Balloons – Children can choke or suffocate on deflated or broken balloons. Keep deflated balloons away from children younger than eight years old. Discard torn balloons immediately.
  • Small balls and other toys with small parts – For children younger than age three, avoid toys with small parts, which can cause choking.
  • Scooters and other riding toys – Riding toys, skateboards and in-line skates go fast, and falls could be deadly. Helmets and safety gear should be worn properly at all times and they should be sized to fit.
  • Check the label: Choose age appropriate toys by reading the age label on the toy. Children younger than 3 should not have access to toys with small parts, which can cause choking. Also avoid marbles and small balls for children under 3.
  • Get safety gear. With scooters and other riding toys, supervision is key along with proper safety gear that includes helmets. Helmets should be worn properly at all times and they should be sized to fit. Avoid riding a scooter on a street or roadway with other motor vehicles.
  • Keep toys appropriate for older children away from younger siblings.
  • Battery charging should be supervised by adults. Chargers and adapters can pose thermal burn hazards to young children. Pay attention to instructions and warnings on battery chargers. Some chargers lack any mechanism to prevent overcharging.

See more on toy safety at the CPSC..

 

Don’t let Halloween get *real* scary for your kids


We’re just one sleep away from the scariest, spookiest night of the year – check out our spooky guide for local Halloween happenings. Fake scary is great fun, but you don’t want things to get real scary for your kids. Make sure your activities don’t include a visit the scariest place of all – your local emergency room. On Halloween, for every adult, job #1 is kid safety.

The National Safety Council (NSC) offers this truly frightening statistic:

“Children are more than twice as likely to be hit by a car and killed on Halloween than on any other day of the year. In 2017, October ranked No. 2 in motor vehicle deaths by month, with 3,700. July is No. 1, with 3,830 deaths.”

One of the contributing factors may be that so many Halloween activities take place after dark. The NSC shows this pictorial of when accidents occur, created using federal data.

See more on Halloween Safety On and Off the Road, a sheet of tips to protect kids from the NSC.

If your kids are trick or treating at dusk or dark, make sure that their costumes and masks don’t impede vision and don’t have any tripping hazards. Be sure they carry flashlights and it would be a good idea to put reflective tape on dark costumes. The American Academy of Pediatrics offers more Halloween Safety Tips to help you protect children from dangerous costumes and other seasonal hazards.

In addition to traffic safety, pumpkin carving injuries, trips & falls and choking injuries are all among some of the most common Halloween-related injuries that could make for a scary unplanned visit to the emergency room. Check out our roundup of tips on keeping your kids safe from our prior post: Pumpkins, perils & more. And if you have pets, the holiday holds many dangers for them too – check out our Halloween Perils for Pets.

The Children’s Safety Network offers the following Halloween safety infographic:

If it’s May, it must be National Bicycle Month! Is your bike road ready?


bicycle month

There are a few sure signs of spring – the swallows return to Capistrano, the trees begin to bud, and you see more bicycles on the road. To kick off the season, May is National Bike Month – time to get your bike tuned up so you can participate in Bike to School Day on May 10, Bike to Work Week from May 15-19 and Bike to Work Day on May 19!

And as part of our spring ritual, we like to gather some good resources for everything you need to know to have bike ship-shape and road-ready for the good weather ahead.

Popular Mechanics offers a handy pictorial guide to 9 things to do to check your bicycle for spring.

Check out our prior post on ensuring you get the right fit on bike helmets — particularly important for kid riders. We sourced some excellent guides to get you up to speed on bike helmet safety.

Don’t let your season be ruined by theft. Check out our posts on protecting your bicycle from bike thieves and get the scoop on what you need to know about insurance for your bike to protect your investment.

It’s also a good idea to brush up on bicycle safety – a 2014 report on biking fatalities shows the high risk groups and problems that can occur. Bike safety is important for everybody but particularly important for kids – check out these handy resources.

See our 2016 Bike Month tool kit post for links to bike clubs in New England and some helpful videos for prepping your bike for the season.

It’s National Playground Safety Week


We’re all for any reason to keep kids safe so we’re more than happy to inform you that this week is National Playground Safety Week. Safe Kids USA asks “do you know what to look for to make sure your playground is safe? Sometimes the risks don’t appear as obvious as those associated with swimming or biking; but, they’re there and easy to spot. You just need to know what to look for.”
And the risks are all too real – not just at public playgrounds but at home and school playgrounds too. Consider these sobering stats:

  • The leading cause of death related to the playground and playground equipment is strangulation, accounting for over 50% of the deaths.
  • Nearly 70% of all playground related deaths occur on home playgrounds.
  • Falls are the most common mode of playground injury accounting for approximately 80% of all playground-related injuries and about 20% of all deaths.
  • About 45% of playground-related injuries are severe, which include fractures, internal injuries, concussions, dislocations, and amputations.
  • More from the Playground Safety Fact Sheet

If you are a parent or if you have kids in your life, these stats should put you on alert! It’s important for parents to advocate for their kids to ensure safe public playgrounds. It’s also important for parents who are homeowners to ensure that any private play areas meet the best and safest standards, too. Don’t forget about the pools!
Here are Top Playground Safety Tips from Safe Kids:

  • Playground surfacing material should be 12 inches deep and extend 6 feet in all directions around equipment.
  • Look for playgrounds with shredded rubber, mulch, wood chips or sand. Grass and soil are not good surfaces.
  • Make sure playground equipment is inspected frequently and kept in good repair. If it’s not, report this to your local parks and recreations office.
  • Remove hood and neck drawstrings from children’s clothing and outerwear and don’t let kids wear helmets, necklaces, purses or scarves on the playground.
  • Don’t allow your kids to engage in, or play near, any pushing, shoving or crowding around playground equipment.
  • Keep toddlers under age 5 in a separate play area, away from equipment designed for bigger kids.
  • Actively supervise kids on a playground. Just being in the same area isn’t good enough – they need your undivided attention while playing on or around the equipment.

Safe Kids has a variety of other useful tools to help you know what to look for in assessing playground safety. Here are a few good resources:
Tips for parents in assessing the safety of a playground
Sports Injury Prevention Tips
State laws on concussion prevention (PDF)
Concussion Guide for Parents (PDF)
Sports Safety Checklist (PDF)
Dehydration & heat illness prevention

Children’s auto booster seat ratings; child restraint laws


The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS) has issued new ratings for children’s auto booster seats. They’ve examined 60 models covering almost all models sold in the U.S. right now, and they’ve issue 9 “best bet” recommendations and 4 “good bet” recommendations. In addition, they’ve indicated 11 products which aren’t aren’t recommended due to poor fit.
IIHS states that more than 1,000 children 12 and younger in passenger vehicles die in crashes every year, and more than 100,000 are injured. Parents can reduce the risk to their kids by properly securing them in the back seat of their vehicle.

“Parents can’t tell a good booster from a bad one just by comparing design features and price,” says Anne McCartt, Institute senior vice president for research. “What really matters is if the booster you’re considering correctly positions the safety belt on your 4-8 year-old in your vehicle. Our ratings make it easier to pick a safer booster for kids who have outgrown child restraints.”