How do you protect your credit rating during the pandemic?


worried couple checking credit reports on computer

Worried about if the pandemic is affecting your credit? Here’s good news to help you monitor your credit status: Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion, the three major credit rating bureaus, are now offering free weekly online reports through April 2021. Normally, you are entitled to one report per year for free, so this is a great tool and it’s important that you take advantage of it.

The three nationwide credit reporting companies have joined forces to make it easy for you to request your reports through a central website annualcreditreport.com.  Beware of pretenders that will try to charge you – this is  the only authorized way to get free credit reports.

Why it’s important to monitor your credit reports

Your credit report is a historical record of your credit activity and loan paying history. Lenders use this information when you look to open a credit card, borrow money to buy a house or a car, or take a loan for other purposes. Credit reports may affect your mortgage rates, credit card approvals, apartment requests, or even your job application. In some states, they can be a factor in your insurance premium. Reviewing your credit report helps you ensure that its accurate and may help you spot signs of identity theft early.

It’s particularly important that you review your reports now if the pandemic has caused any disruption in your finances or if you took advantage of any financial aid through the CARES Act, which allowed postponement of some federally backed mortgages and federal student loans through September 30. Your credit should not be affected by this, but Consumer Reports says that some people are experiencing problems. See: How to Protect Your Credit Score During the Coronavirus Pandemic

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, an official US government website, also offers helpful information on protecting your credit during the coronavirus pandemic. They also maintain an excellent library of resources, and tools to help you protect your finances during the coronavirus pandemic.

Each of the major credit bureaus also offer advice, tools and resources on protecting your credit through the pandemic:

 

Why it’s important to monitor your credit history every year


creditYour credit history is very important. A good credit report can help or hurt you when you look for a car loan, a mortgage or some insurance policies. You may be denied loans or credit cards if you history is poor, or you may end up paying higher rates on credit cards or for insurance coverage. (See: Credit-Based Insurance Scores: How an Insurance Company Can Use Your Credit to Determine Your Premium) Some employers may even look at your credit rating as a factor in whether or not to hire you.

You should monitor your credit rating yearly, learn more about what helps and hurts you, and review reports to be sure there isn’t anything inaccurate. Some reasons you should monitor your credit annually:

  • Find problems that are hurting your good rating and try to improve
  • Identify mistakes and get them corrected
  • Watch for signs of potential identity theft
  • Somebody else’s information might be mistakenly attributed to you
  • You might find accounts that are not yours

By law, you can get one free copy of your credit report every year. That includes one copy from each of the three major reporting companies: TransUnion, Equifax and Experian. But you need to be careful about where you get your free credit reports from. Here is the authorized source:

Annual Credit Report at 1-877-322-8228
AnnualCreditReport.com

You will hear a lot of promotions for “free credit reports” – but consumer beware! Many of them make reports free but have some type of a catch – see this short video to learn more.

 What if you find problems in your credit report?

According to consumer.gov, you can take these steps to fix any mistakes or problems:
Write a letter. Tell the credit reporting company that you have questions about information in your report.

  • Explain which information is wrong and why you think so.
  • Say that you want the information corrected or removed from your report.
  • Send a copy of your credit report with the wrong information circled.
  • Send copies of other papers that help you explain your opinion.
  • Send this information Certified Mail. Ask the post office for a return receipt. The receipt is proof that the credit reporting company got your letter.
  • The credit reporting company must look into your complaint and answer you in writing.

The FTC offers more information: