What’s most likely to kill you? Check out your odds for National Safety Month


cartoon of a business man hanging on to a rope above swimming sharks

It’s National Safety Month, which is a great time double down on safety both at work and at home. But where to start? One way to think about safety practices and injury prevention is to focus on the types of injuries that are most common and most likely. With the summer approaching, expect that any day now we will start seeing alarming stories about shark danger. While no one wants to get attacked by a shark and it’s certainly good to take precautions, in reality, there’s a greater chance you will die by choking on your lobster roll than by being eaten by a shark. Media attention to sensational stories about crime, disasters and unusual tragedies tend to distort our sense of what the real risks we face actually are.

The National Safety Council puts things in perspective in this short video:

The purpose of insurance is to offer you financial protection from accidental risks and calamities that may befall you. But even when you are properly insured, it’s still in your best interests to try to manage those risks as best you can because insurance may not make you whole – particularly when the risk involves life and limb. We often don’t do a good job of managing our risks. Sometimes, what we fear the most is actually less risky than other common every day occurrences. Human nature being what it is, people often worry more about rare events and can be too casual about dangers that are more pervasive.

Learn the top causes of unintentional injury and death in your homes and communities from the National Safety Council, or see this chart and learn more on Mortality and Risk from the Insurance Information Institute.

Plus, check out one of our most popular past posts: What are the odds? Mortality calculators, where we various tools and calculators that let you assess your mortality. Don’t miss one of the web’s longtime favorite sites, the Internet Death Clock, where you can calculate optimistic or pessimistic estimates of how much time you are likely to live.

Despite the odds, one sad fact remains: None of us get out of here alive, so as the late Warren Zevon advised, “Enjoy every sandwich.” And as long as you are thinking about odds, it might also be a good time to think about taking care of your survivors:

Life Insurance Survey: Most people have too little.

A few other past posts on the topic of risks and dangers

 

Not to be too spooky, but how much is your body worth?


Happy Halloween! We couldn’t think of a more appropriate and ghoulish topic for the day than finding out what your body is worth. The excellent infographic below gives you a good body-part-by-body-part snapshot of your market value. (Click for larger). Or fill out a brief questionnaire for a more personalized version of your body’s worth in dollars and cents.

If you are feeling really macabre, you may want to visit the The Death Clock, which bills itself as “the Internet’s friendly reminder that life is slipping away… second by second.” Enter your date of birth, sex, BMI and smoking status. You can choose to your results on a scale ranging from “sadistic” to “optimistic” – or just plain “normal.” If things look really dire, think about your life insurance coverage and update your beneficiaries.  Oh — and we really can’t think of a better way to celebrate the day and ensure your longevity than to sign up as an organ donor.

body-value

What kills us?


Aaron Carroll is a physician and health policy researcher. He produces a series of videos called Healthcare Triage which answer a lot of questions people have about medicine, health, and healthcare. In his recent video, he talks about risk and mortality, saying:

One of the things that baffles me about people is how they completely misunderstand risk. Lots of my friends panic about things that have no real chance of killing them, but ignore the things that will. This can lead us to make irrational decisions, and sometimes irrational policy. What really will kill us? Watch and learn.

Read more about where he got his statistics:

No matter the odds, we never know what life has in store for us … and that’s where insurance comes in. Take reasonable precautions to lower your risk of injury or death and have protection in place to minimize the financial impact of any problems that do occur. If you have dependents who rely on your income, be sure to have adequate life insurance in place.

What are the odds? Mortality calculators


Given that it’s Life Insurance Awareness Month, we thought we might offer a few tools for you to assess your risk of imminent mortality. We’ve mixed the serious with the silly to lighten things up a bit.

Heart Disease Risk Calculator – estimate your chance of a cardiac event or a stroke in the next 10 years.

Are you likely to die of a shark attack? Compare the relative risk of shark attacks to humans to various other risks.

Life Expectancy Table – find your age and your sex to learn the additional number of years you may expect to live.

The Death Clock bills itself as “the Internet’s friendly reminder that life is slipping away… second by second.” Enter your date of birth, sex, bmi and smoking status. You can choose to your results on a scale ranging from “sadistic” to “optimistic” – or just plain “normal.”