Infographic and expert tips for Cyber Security Month


October is National Cyber Security Month – an annual reminder to safeguard your digital information and review your online safety practices. It’s a good time to ensure your software is up-to-date and take a few moments to review expert advise to ensure you have maximum protection against emerging threats.

National Cybersecurity Awareness Month is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Homeland Security the National Cyber Security Alliance, a private consortium. Whether you are an individual, a family or a business, each of these links offer tips, tools and resources to help you stay safe online. We’ve included an infographic below.

Here are some other tips from cyber security experts

Infographic with syber security tips

66 ways to protect your identity and privacy


PrivacyNot again. The news is full of reports that more than 500 million online users had their privacy breached in the recent Yahoo online hack. Yahoo is not alone – LinkedIn, MySpace, Dropbox, Target, Anthem, Sony — it’s impossible to keep track, but you can see a list of the largest data breaches of all time for a trip down memory lane. And now we learn that Russian hackers are trying to compromise our voting and election systems.

What’s a person to do?

Well, if you fear your info was leaked in the recent Yahoo leak, the company has an info page of signs of a hacked Yahoo account and what to do.

But taking remedial steps after the horse gets out of the barn doesn’t help you much for protection  from the next attack. If your house was robbed, you’d take steps to beef up security, and online isn’t much different – you need to take serious preventive steps now to avoid exposure. It’s human nature to put this off – plus, it can be hard to know just what steps to take. That’s why we were happy to see that the recent Consumer Reports has made online security a focus of the new issue.

Their excellent article 66 Ways to Protect Your Privacy Right Now is a comprehensive must-read, covering online, mobile and real-world security matters. It includes concrete tips, how-tos, and videos on the following topics:

  • Screen locks
  • Snail mail privacy
  • Unbreakable passwords
  • Mobile account safety
  • Connected devices
  • Handling public WiFi
  • Everyday encryption
  • Facebook settings
  • Home WiFi settings
  • Boosting web browser privacy
  • Beating ransomware
  • How to avoid phishing schemes
  • Google settings

If you find 66 steps a little overwhelming, here’s their suggestion for a shortcut: The Consumer Reports 10-Minute Digital Privacy Tuneup

Here are some related resources that we’ve previously posted:

 

Take these quizzes to see how safe you are online


octoberThink you’re safe online? October is Cyber Security Awareness month – a good time to put things to the test.Take these two quizzes to see how you fare.

Phishing Quiz – Think you can Outsmart Internet Scammers?
Ever wonder how good you are at telling the difference between a legitimate website and one that’s a phishing attempt? Take this quiz to find out.

How cyber-savvy are you?
Test your knowledge about the cyber security risks you face every day. Take the 11-question quiz to find out how cyber-savvy you are!

Whether on a desktop, laptop or mobile device, your password is often your greatest point of vulnerability. Is your password on the list of the Top 500 Worst Passwords of All Time? If so, change it now!

Staying Cyber Safe During Your Vacations


beach-surfing.jpg
June is Online Safety Awareness Month – good timing since we are approaching peak vacation season, it’s worth setting aside a few minutes to take stock of your mobile computing safety. As you travel, every place from coffee shops to hotels will compete for your business by touting the availability of free WiFi and high-speed internet access – a benefit that is great anywhere, but that is particularly valuable when you leave the country. But when using those networks, have you ever stopped to think about how secure those connections are? And even if you are on a secure network — one that requires a log in — you may still be exposed to others who are using that same network. Could that teen sitting near you be practicing hacking skills? Could the surfer at the corner table be looking to steal your identity? Others on the same network can access readily available tools to intercept unencrypted data that is passing over networks. Your session could even be hijacked. On a public network, you must use precautions when transmitting any information that is personal, financial, or confidential in nature.
Even people who take every precaution on home and work computers can be fairly cavalier when it comes to mobile devices – it’s easy to forget that our phones and tablets are really computers and subject to the same security risks. Lifehacker has a good article on how to stay safe on public wi-fi networks – explaining how to turn off Sharing and enable your firewall on various devices, and how to automate your public WiFi security settings. It also suggests using SSL whenever possible and explains what this means and how to do it. Another suggestion is to set up a Virtual Private Network (VPN). ArsTechnica talks more about VPNs and other security issues at public WiFi hotspot.
Here are more tips from experts:
Tips for Using Public Wi-Fi Networks – from On Guard Online
Four safety tips for using Wi-Fi from Microsoft
Security Using High-Speed Internet at Hotels
Identity Protection Tips for the Summer Traveler

A conman you should listen to


He’s been called the world’s greatest conman. Leonardo DiCaprio played him in the 2002 film Catch Me If You Can – based on his successful cons while impersonating a Pan Am pilot, a Georgia doctor, and a Louisiana parish prosecutor. And he might just be one of the best people to listen to when it comes to protecting your identity.

Today, Frank Abagnale is one of the world’s most respected authorities on the subjects of forgery, embezzlement and secure documents. He’s been consulting with the FBI and with governments, businesses, and financial institutions around the globe for more than 35 years.
We spotted a recent article in The Guardian about how Facebook users risk identity theft that offers some great security tips from Frank – its worth reading. His biggest message is not to expect social media companies to protect your identity – its your responsibility to stay safe. Some of his advice:

“If you tell me your date of birth and where you’re born [on Facebook] I’m 98% [of the way] to stealing your identity,” he said. “Never state your date of birth and where you were born [on personal profiles], otherwise you are saying ‘come and steal my identity’.”

He also advised Facebook users to never choose a passport-style photograph as a profile picture, and instead use group photographs.

Click through to read the whole article and view the video interview. He’s worth listening to!