Handling pet fears in thunder & lightning storms


illustration of frightened cat thinking omg

When the thunder roars and the lightning crackles, there’s a primal satisfaction in being snug and dry beneath a stout roof surrounded by sturdy walls. And that’s just as true for your pets as it is for you and the rest of your family.

To keep your pets safe, keep them inside during bad weather. If you keep animals in a shed, barn or doghouse, make sure your outbuildings are structurally sound and properly grounded. A doghouse isn’t safe in a lightning strike – it’s best to move Rover inside. Cats left outside will often shelter in parked cars or beneath trees, both dangerous options during a lightning storm.

Some dogs and even some cats suffer from thunderstorm phobias. They’re extremely fearful of the stimuli caused by thunderstorms: lightning, thunder, strong winds, and even changes in barometric pressure. If your pet regularly freaks out when it’s bad out (by pacing, drooling, peeing or pooping inappropriately, hiding, or excessive vocalizing or destructive behavior), consult your veterinarian. There are different ways to treat thunderstorm phobia, from behavior modification to medication. It’s important not to reinforce bad behavior: during storms, don’t attempt to punish your pet’s behavior, nor should you try to comfort your pet (this is a hard one to resist).

Keeping your pets calm and dry when the weather is wet and wild isn’t just common sense. It’s as good for you as it is for them – the more stress you can address, the happier you and your fuzzy buddy will be.

For more information:

 

 

Animals enjoying Christmas


Just for the holidays, we bring you an array of videos of animals enjoying Christmas. And if you don’t get your fill here, try our Cats & Dogs of Christmas 2015.

First up – Internet favorite pooch Maymo is surprised by a puppy for Christmas

How to protect your tree

Gift wrapping tips

Not many people know it, but Santa often makes the rounds to the world’s zoos before he visits children. Here  are a few of his early stops.

Dog owners: protect yourself from an expensive dog bite claim


Do you have a dog? If so, you want to be sure that your dog is trained, that you comply with any state or local restraint laws, and that you are adequately covered by your insurance. Although the number of dog bite claims is trending down, the cost for those claims is trending up – the average dog bite claim is now $37,214. That’s the national average so depending on where you live, the cost might be higher: Arizona was $56,654, California is $44,983 and New York is $44,320. Ouch.

May 15 through 21 is dog Bite Prevention Week. Learn how to prevent dog bites and how to keep dogs from taking a bite out of your insurance.

The Insurance Information Institute has some great information on Dog Bite Liability:

There are three kinds of law that impose liability on owners:

1) A dog-bite statute: where the dog owner is automatically liable for any injury or property damage the dog causes without provocation.
2) The one-bite rule: where the dog owner is responsible for an injury caused by a dog if the owner knew the dog was likely to cause that type of injury—in this case, the victim must prove the owner knew the dog was dangerous.
3) Negligence laws: where the dog owner is liable if the injury occurred because the dog owner was unreasonably careless (negligent) in controlling the dog.

Also, see our prior post about 10 dog breeds that might cause problems with your home insurance

Some insurance companies will limit homeowners insurance availability based on dog breed or dog history. PropertyCasualty360 has an article on the 10 dog breeds most often blacklisted by home insurance carriers.

Many insurance companies don’t have a blanket breed ban. The MSPCA cites several national insurers that will instead “… work on a case by case basis, considering the individual dog’s behavior and history, and may require a meet and greet with the dog and/or a Canine Good Citizen certification.”

And here’s a good infographic from the American Veterinary Medical Association:

dog bite infographic

Next week: Dog Bite Prevention Week


May 19-25 is Dog Bite Prevention Week – the infographic below includes some interesting dog bite facts. The Postal Service commemorates the event with its annual ranking of top cities for dog attacks – they learned the hard way, racking up 5,581 postal employees attacks — just a small portion of the 4.5 million people in the U.S. bitten last year.

The Insurance Information Institute tells us that the average cost of a dog bite claim in 2013 was a whopping $27,862. They offer a list of the 10 states with the highest number and cost of dog bite claims. To learn more about the insurance implications of dog ownership, see our prior post Insurance and Your Dog

National Dog Bite Prevention Week 2013, May 19-25
Dog Bites by the Numbers

Your Cat Has an Important Safety Reminder for You This Weekend


cat-guide

If cats could talk, they’d remind you that this week is Daylight’s Savings Time so you need to set your clock ahead one hour. Plus, they’d tell you that it’s a good time to change the batteries in your smoke detector and your carbon monoxide detectors.

What, you think your cat doesn’t care?

Not true… the idea that cats are aloof is a just a myth — and we can prove it. Just last week, a cat named Meatball saved eleven people by waking its human when it smelled smoke in a French farmhouse. But don’t count on the cat detector method to save your family – change your batteries this weekend.

Check out this cute video, a Cat’s Guide to Taking Care of Your Human to see some other ways that our cats look out for us.