It’s Men’s Health Week!


June - Men's Health Month

June is Men’s Health month, and this being the week leading up to Father’s Day, it’s also Men’s Health Week. The purpose of Men’s Health Week & Month is to heighten the awareness of preventable health problems and encourage early detection and treatment of disease among men and boys. On average, men live about 5 years less than their female counterparts – maybe that is directly related to the fact that men make half as many visits for prevention as women. Promoting men’s health information is a way to change that. The photo in this post is from one of an excellent series of posters and flyers available at Men’s Health Month – why not print and share in your workplace?

Also on point, Dr. David Samadi looks at 7 Things Men Must Know About Their Health, which includes interesting and important information to know, such as the fact that more younger men are being diagnosed with prostate cancer – an nearly six-fold increase in the last twenty years.
He also notes that men who exercise may reduce age-related cholesterol.

His fifth point offers a Men’s Health Screening Guide by Age, valuable information that we think deserves sharing:

For men in their 30s
Complete physical every 2 years
Get blood pressure checked every year
Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years
Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years
Testicular self-exam every month

For men in their 40s
Get blood pressure checked every year
Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years
Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years
Testicular self-exam every month
Complete physical every 2 years
Baseline prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test and digital rectal exam (DRE)
Stool test (for colon and rectal cancers) every year

For men in their 50s
Get blood pressure checked every year
Cancer screenings for thyroid, testicles, lymph nodes, mouth and skin every three years
Cholesterol test for total LDL, HDL (the good kind) every three years
Testicular self-exam every month
A sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy (for colon cancers) every three to four years or as recommended by your healthcare provider
PSA and DRE exam every year

For another good checklist, the Men’s Health Network offers Health Screening Timeline Checklists for both Men and Women – it’s a PDF you can download and share.

With Father’s Day coming up, here’s some good health news from NPR for men who love golf: Take A Swing At This: Golf Is Exercise, Cart Or No Cart. The article cites the The World Golf Foundation in estimating that “golfers who walk an 18-hole course clock about 5 miles and burn up to 2,000 calories.” But even those who use carts get a pretty good workout, burning about 1,300 calories during an 18-hole round.

Plus, there’s a good stress-relieving benefit: “There’s also a mental boost for lots of players. “There’s rarely a bad day on the golf course,” Gary Metzger says. “You’re breathing good air and looking around at the nice scenery.”

How to show the women in your life a little love this week …


May 11-17 is National Women’s Health Week, an observance led by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women’s Health. While there are many important health issues, a key focus of should always be on heart health. Heart disease is the #1 killer of women and nearly one in three American women have high blood pressure. Why not show a little love for your mom, your wife, your sisters or your women friends by encouraging them to schedule a Well Woman visit to get a checkup and to learn more about heart risk? For more on women and heart disease, check out The Heart Truth, a program of the National Institutes of Health. There are many great resources and tools available – why not share some of these important messages and excellent materials with the women in your lives – and also on social media!

10 Years of @TheHeartTruth: Celebrating a Decade of Inspiring Women to Protect their Hearts.

Swine Flu – H1N1 – Information and Resources


In this video, Dr. Joe Bresee of the CDC Influenza Division describes swine flu – its signs and symptoms, how it’s transmitted, medicines to treat it, steps people can take to protect themselves from it, and what people should do if they become ill.

Additional resources:

PandemicFlu.gov – Individuals & Families Planning – tools to help you plan for challenges that you might face, particularly if a pandemic is severe.
Swine Influenza (Flu) – Resources, updates and news from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It includes a chart that lists confirmed cases by state. Also see the CDC Twitter feed CDCemergency and What’s new on the CDC Swine Flu Site
Taking Care of a Sick Person in Your Home
Hand Washing: An easy way to prevent infection – Learn the proper way to kill germs from the folks at the Mayo Clinic
General Instructions for Disposable Respirators – brief video from the CDC that demonstrates how to put on and take off disposable respirators.

Frequently asked questions

CDC: Swine Influenza and You
Frequently asked questions from PandemicFlu.gov

Swine Flu Maps

H1N1 Swine Flu